The following pictures are from the area of Ralph Stover State Park known as High Rocks. It was originally known as Boileaus Rocks. Here there is a 200 foot sheer rock face cliff overlooking Tohickon Creek. The name Tohickon comes from the Lene Lenape Indians who named it to mean "Deer-Bone-Creek." Ralph Stover park was created in 1931 when the heirs of Ralph Stover, the owner of an 18th century grain mill on the site, donated the land. The High Rocks section of the park was donated to the state by author James Michener.

This is the view from the top of High Rocks, overlooking the Tohickon Creek.

Another picture of the view

 
Photo by Richard Hanauer
 
The view from the overlook

 
Photo by Chuck Rudy
 
A similar view

This photo was taken just before the peak of autumn colors.

Another picture of the tree canopy.

 
Photo by Chuck Rudy
 
Kayakers can be seen in this photo, enojying some white water after a large rainstorm the day before.

A rock formation. Many of the rocks have a reddish hue.

The area is very popular with rock climbers.

Quickly descending after reaching the top.

 
Photo by Chuck Rudy
 
Bouldering without ropes is also popular.

 
Photo by Chuck Rudy
 
With or without ropes, rock climbing can be dangerous and accidents do occur.

 
Photo by Chuck Rudy
 
 

 
Photo by Chuck Rudy
 
Rocks are not the only dangers in the park. However, this local resident, the Eastern Milk Snake, is harmless.

 
Photo by Chuck Rudy
 
The steep slopes of High Rocks.

One of the steep hillsides in the park.

 
Photo by Chuck Rudy
 
 

This is the road leading into the park, bordered by trees, some with green, others with autumn yellow colors.